History, art, music, and coffee come together for the Telegraph’s first after work event

Historian Diane Euston will be discussing her crusade to keep The Paseo’s name on Friday, April 9, at Martin City Coffee, 131st & Holmes Rd. The special evening, presented by the Martin City Telegraph will also feature an artists reception featuring antique Gallup map collector Pat Carroll, and photographer Helen Brown-Graham, whose art is on display there. Traditional guitarist Kelly Wenz will perform. Light hors d’ouerves will be served.

Historian Diane Euston

Diane Euston, history columnist for the Telegraph, will have a short discussion on “The Past and Present of The Paseo” and why she is collecting signatures to rename another street Martin Luther King Blvd, rather than the historic Paseo. She will be collecting signatures at the event.

Gallup Map owner Pat Carroll. Photo courtesy Facebook.

Pat Carroll, owner of the Gallup Map & Art Co. in downtown KC, will talk about his collection of old Kansas City maps now displayed at the coffee shop and how he re-creates them into art.

Photographer Helen Brown-Graham. Photo courtesy Helen Brown-Graham.

Helen Brown-Graham, photographer and also owner of Quinn’s Laundry, 99th & Holmes, will discuss her B&W photography series called Black Hearts now on display at Martin City Coffee.

Kelly Werts

Guitarist Kelly Werts will perform early traditional music. Werts co-wrote the theme song to Rare Visions and Roadside Revelations on PBS and the High Plains Public Radio show, “Little Spouse on the Prairie”.

Martin City Coffee has opened the patio and introduced new items on their menu. If late afternoon coffee is not your cup of tea, then maybe delicious infused organic herbal tea is.

For more information, call 816-492-7227.

4 Replies to “Diane Euston leads Paseo discussion at artists reception Friday evening”

  1. We were unable to attend but we would really like to sign the petition, is it possible?

    Thanks
    Lew Bunch
    816-213-6789

  2. So let me get this straight… a bunch of white people who couldn’t find that part of town without a map show up 2 years later and they say removing MLK isn’t about race? That dog don’t hunt.

    1. First one would have to assume there are no white people who live or ever lived on The Paseo in order for your stereotype to be true. I believe if The Paseo were to be changed to any name at all, it would receive the same uproar. The fact that 63rd Street was not the street renamed smacks more of racism than The Paseo (it goes into a white neighborhood). This was really just one more case of Mayor Sly James bullying his projects through City Council, very similar to the airport, making Kansas City look like a bunch of fools because proper protocol wasn’t followed.

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